Thursday, February 18, 2016

Now that tens of thousands of educators have tried the Hour of Code, many classrooms are ready for more creative, less one-size-fits-all activities that teach the basics of computer science. To help teachers find inspiration, we collected and curated one-hour teacher-led lesson and activity plans designed for different subject areas for Hour of Code veterans.

Elementary School

Scratch Animate Your Name
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Students will animate the letters of their name, initials, or favorite word using Scratch!
Scratch Hide and Seek Game
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Students will gain experience with coding as they make a hide-and-seek game.
Scratch Dance, Dance, Dance
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Participants will create and code an animated dance scene.
ScratchJr: Can I Make a Spooky Forest?
Ages 5-9. Art, Storytelling, Sequence, Unplugged. Students will learn more features of ScratchJr by creating a spooky forest with multiple characters!
ScratchJr: Can I Make My Characters Greet Each Other?
Ages 5-9. Art, Storytelling, Events, Unplugged. Students will learn advanced features of the ScratchJr app when they make a dog and kitten meet each other and exchange hellos!
ScratchJr: Can I Make the Sun Set?
Ages 5-9. Programming, Storytelling, Mathematics, Creativity, Unplugged. Students will get an introduction to programming by making a sun set over a city landscape using ScratchJr!
My Robotic Friend
Ages 5-18. Sequence, Algorithms, Programming, Unplugged. Students use paper and pencils to create programs to teach their "Robotic Friends" how to stack plastic cups into a specific design.
Conditionals with Cards
Ages 8-12. Sequence, Algorithms, Condtionals, Unplugged. Use playing cards (or dice, or sheets of paper...anything with the ability to randomize) to create a program on paper for the class to follow. This program will utilize the randomization, along with "if" and "else" statements, to add uncertainty to your game's outcome.
Binary Baubles
Ages 8-18. Sequence, Algorithms, Programming, Unplugged. Make fun take-home items that "store" students' initials using only two colors.
Bomberbot Hour of Code Activities
Ages 8-12. Sequence, Algorithms, Programming, Unplugged or Web-based. Students will learn a series of programming concepts and apply them to programming a robot.
STEM Projects
Ages 5-18. Programming, Science (Ecology), Science (Space), Web-based. Code and animate a Solar System simulation, an interactive ecological pyramid, a working analog clock, and more.
Rock, Paper, Scissors
Ages 10-15. Science (Biology), Unplugged. This activity builds off of the classic game of Rock/Paper/Scissors, known to most students, and relates it to a phenomenon seen in biology.
Kodable fuzzFamily Frenzy
Ages 5-9. Seqence, Algorithms, Programming, Unplugged. Students will learn basic programing language and use math concepts to move a “robot” forward, spin, and jump.
Google CS First
Ages 9-14 Sequence, Programming, Art, Storytelling, Web-based. Students use Scratch to code a story about being lost at sea.
Bitsbox Coding + Math
Ages 5-13. Programming, Math (General, Geometry), Web-based.
Bitsbox Coding + Science
Ages 5-9. Programming, Science (General, Biology, Chemistry, Physics), Web-based.
Bitsbox Coding + Art
Ages 5-9, Programming. Language Arts, Visual Arts, Music, Web-based.
Flocabulary On One Condition
Ages 7-13. Programming, Language arts, Storytelling, Web-based. Students will learn how to write conditional statements and complete an activity sequence where they generate their own conditionals, evaluate given conditionals to determine the outcome of a program.

Middle School

Scratch Animate Your Name
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Students will animate the letters of their name, initials, or favorite word using Scratch!
Scratch Hide and Seek Game
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Students will gain experience with coding as they make a hide-and-seek game.
Scratch Dance, Dance, Dance
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Participants will create and code an animated dance scene.
STEM Projects
Ages 5-18. Programming, Science (Ecology), Science (Space), Web-based. Code and animate a Solar System simulation, an interactive ecological pyramid, a working analog clock, and more.
Bomberbot Hour of Code Activities
Ages 8-12. Sequence, Algorithms, Programming, Unplugged or Web-based. Students will learn a series of programming concepts and apply them to programming a robot.
Input and Output, Math Activity
Ages 12-16. Math (Algebra), Math (Functions), Unplugged. Connect JavaScript functions to both math and real world problems.
Climate Science
Ages 12-16. Science (Climate), Science (Environment), Unplugged. Students draw a picture, and take turns giving the class steps to recreate their drawing.
Google CS First
Ages 9-14 Sequence, Programming, Art, Storytelling, Web-based. Students use Scratch to code a story about being lost at sea.
Arduino Activity
Ages 12-15. Programming, Arduino Ever wonder how toys make noises and blink lights when you push buttons? Microcontrollers and circuits are used in all sorts of everyday objects. From remote controlled cars to robots and drones.
Secret Codes Activity
Ages 12-15. Ciphers, Math (Cryptography), Scratch, Web-based. Turing has done many things for computer science (often called the father of computer science) but today we will focus on one very important one that helped with the invention of computers.
Computer History Activity
Ages 12-15. History, Storytelling, Scratch, Google Docs, Unplugged Your class will be be creating a 'history of computers' web page/Scratch project/video that we can share with the world. To make this web page, you and your partner will do research and write about one important event or person in computer history
Grace Hopper Debugging Activity
Ages 12-18. History, Language Arts, Storytelling, Unplugged Students will research Grace Hopper and learn the story of the first "bug".
Flocabulary On One Condition
Ages 7-13. Programming, Language arts, Storytelling, Web-based. Students will learn how to write conditional statements and complete an activity sequence where they generate their own conditionals, evaluate given conditionals to determine the outcome of a program.

High School

STEM Projects
Ages 5-18. Programming, Science (Ecology), Science (Space), Web-based. Code and animate a Solar System simulation, an interactive ecological pyramid, a working analog clock, and more.
CodeHS Pixel Art
Ages 14-18. Art, Math (Coordinates), Unplugged. Students learn about coordinates, what pixels are, and how to create drawings by setting pixels to be different colors.
10 Minutes of Code using a T.I. Calculator
Ages 13-18. Math (Algebra), Math (Functions), Programming, unplugged, TI-84™ Plus graphing calculator required.
Scratch Animate Your Name
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Students will animate the letters of their name, initials, or favorite word using Scratch!
Scratch Hide and Seek Game
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Students will gain experience with coding as they make a hide-and-seek game.
Scratch Dance, Dance, Dance
Ages 8 to 16. Programming, Creativity, Web-based. Participants will create and code an animated dance scene.
Looking at Data with Splunk
Ages 14-18. Math (data analysis), Web-based. Students will analyze the data from a theoretical game to find levels which are too easy of difficult.
Input and Output, Math Activity
Ages 12-16. Math (Algebra), Math (Functions), Unplugged. Connect JavaScript functions to both math and real world problems.
Vizwik Voter App
Ages 13-18. Programming, App building. Learn how to build your own mobile app (iOS and Android) to share with friends to vote on a question that is important to you.
Climate Science
Ages 12-16. Science (Climate), Science (Environment), Unplugged. Students draw a picture, and take turns giving the class steps to recreate their drawing.
Mozilla Homework Excuse Generator
Ages 13-18. Programming, Language Arts, Web-based. Use Mozilla's code editor, Thimble, to edit strings inside JavaScript arrays and customize the homework excuse generators.
Fact or Fiction?
Ages 16-18. Programming, Build an App, Web-based. Students create an app to survey whether their classmates think a statement is find a fact or fiction.
Oral History Project
Ages 14-18. Programming, Storytelling, Unplugged CEOHP has worked with a variety of educators to develop ideas for classroom activities, homework, and exam problems based on the interview materials.
Best Technology Activity
Ages 14-18. History, Storytelling, Unplugged Wired.com ran a series of articles in 2013 on each decade of the past 100 years and the significant inventions of those decades. Most interesting to students are the past 20­30 years, with the explosion of technology and the gadgets that ensued.
Arduino Activity Ages 12-15. Programming, Arduino Ever wonder how toys make noises and blink lights when you push buttons? Microcontrollers and circuits are used in all sorts of everyday objects. From remote controlled cars to robots and drones.
Secret Codes Activity
Ages 12-15. Ciphers, Math (Cryptography), Scratch, Web-based. Turing has done many things for computer science (often called the father of computer science) but today we will focus on one very important one that helped with the invention of computers.
Computer History Activity
Ages 12-15. History, Storytelling, Scratch, Google Docs, Unplugged Your class will be be creating a 'history of computers' web page/Scratch project/video that we can share with the world. To make this web page, you and your partner will do research and write about one important event or person in computer history
Grace Hopper Debugging Activity
Ages 12-18. History, Language Arts, Storytelling, Unplugged Students will research Grace Hopper and learn the story of the first "bug".
Globaloria MakeQuest
Ages 14-18. Programming, Game Design, English, Math, Creativity, Web-based. Learn to edit and write JavaScript code to defeat the 'Evil 404,' as you explore computer science concepts like variables and functions. Lesson Plan includes subject-matter extension activities for English, Mathematics, Science, History and Arts classes.

Category: articles

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

AltIt’s important to examine the competencies you would like to see in your organization and compare them to the competencies that a professional certificate holder can bring. But when we analyze competencies, we need to look at both expressed and implied competencies. The expressed competencies are those that are stated in the program, and may be technical or functional in nature. The implied competencies are the ones that are not stated by the program and take some inference to determine. In other words, these are the competencies that the certificate holder will most likely have because he or she went through the program successfully. Also keep in mind that you’ll want to look for competencies that are not only technical and functional, but also related to leadership and management.

The PRM certification brings numerous expressed competencies to your organization’s collective table. The successful completion of the program means that a person is well versed in risk management theory as well as practice, through the mathematics of risk management. The certificate holder must also have the ability to apply theoretical knowledge, as the exam tests application of knowledge, conduct, and ethics through case studies. The expressed competencies in the PRM program are mainly technical and functional in nature.

But let’s analyze the program a little further to look for implied competency for a PRM certificate holder. First, the multiple-choice format of the exams provides us with a picture of someone who is good at making decisions. The fact that the program is self-directed in nature paints a picture of a professional who has drive, determination, and focus. As we’ve mentioned, not all adult learners possess the competency to get through a self-directed study program successfully. Translated into the organizational world, this person will probably have the ability to work well independently.

Because the PRM program allows a candidate to self-assess, you’re going to get a professional who is able to address his or her weaknesses. This is not just acknowledgement of a weakness but the ability to correct that weakness through action, study, or other intervention. The choice between online and classroom preparation also ensures that the professional knows his or her own learning style and can apply it quickly and easily to the learning process. Plus, in relation to learning, a successful completion of the PRM shows you that the person is open to being coached, trained, and managed in a positive direction. All of these combined competencies create a great profile for a potential organizational leader.

The FRM certification through GARP also carries a high level of technical and functional competency, such as market risk, credit risk, and operational risk. The FRM also tests risk management in investment management. Again, this certification proves a certain ability to take knowledge, synthesize it, and apply it to common situations.

In terms of implied competency, the FRM shows us that the certificate holder, because of the elite size of the network, has the ability to see him or herself a part of a larger group. The fact that the person chose the FRM designation shows that he or she is dedicated to the furtherance of the profession and not just interested in his or her own self-interest. It’s also necessary to again consider that a self-directed learner has proven an ability to focus and drive projects through to completion.

In regard to the ERP certification through GARP, we can also see a high level of technical and functional competency, including physical energy markets, financial trading instruments, and valuation and structure of energy related transactions. Because there are specific experience requirements to even sit for the exams, we can also assume a higher level of experience in what is certainly a specialized field.

On the implied level, the ERP certificate holder not only shows his or her determination and focus, but also a level of devotion to a specialized field. When you add the continuing education requirement to this mix, you’ll also see a professional who is certain that he or she is in the field on a permanent basis.

Why are expressed and implied competencies important to your organization? One of the most obvious reasons is that you want to ensure that people in specific positions have a measurable level of functional and technical competency. All of these certification programs prove this competency, as well as experience. But what about bringing in certified professionals as part of your overall leadership “bench” strategy? If you are actively recruiting professionals with the designation, you can be assured that you are going to create a bench of high professional leaders, that is, the ones who can lead and manage functions in their own field. But when you look at the implied competency of these certification programs, you can also be assured that some of those professionals will be high potential leaders, that is, the ones who can be groomed for leadership and management across a spectrum of functional and technical areas.

If you are considering certifying existing associates, think about how that will improve your existing “bench”. The people who readily enter a certification program are proving that they are dedicated to the profession and dedicated to the organization’s future success. Not only this, they are obviously open to being coached and “schooled” on the most current industry knowledge.

Now that we’ve looked at the FRM, PRM, and ERP certifications generally, examined the curricula and exam structures, analyzed recognition and standard, and discovered competencies, the last step is to look at the overall picture of how these things can help your organization.
Category: articles
AltThe move from analog to digital technology has impacted nearly all industries in the world. Whether it is music or information, digital technology delivers near perfect results which were simply not possible with the analog technology. But what is digital technology and how is it different from analog technology?

Digital technology converts the data whether it is sound or information to digits as a series of ones and zeros. If you have seen a pixelated image you will know how a picture gets digitized. If we take a very simple example a black and white picture can be converted into a set of very small black or white squares. The higher the resolution that is desired the smaller the squares need to be. Then each black square can be a one and a white square can be a zero and the picture can thus be represented by ones and zeros.

The advantage of digitizing the sound or data is that it can then be compressed. And where a single analog stream of sound or data could be carried a huge amount of compressed digitized data can be carried. Therefore many channels can be reached to your home over a single digital cable. Once you can get many channels over a single cable you can have far greater control on what to watch and when to watch it. And since the compression makes it easier to carry high resolution images and sound you get great picture and sound quality.

The advantage of compression also means you get high internet speed and if you are using a telephone that leverages digital technology you get clear voice quality. Therefore a high quality digital technology based service as is offered by Comcast deals gives you a great performance at a very affordable price. And the best part of digital cable deals is the advantages of digital technology keep adding up as higher compression is achieved and fatter “pipes” for carrying data are installed. Therefore once you switch over to digital technology not only will you get a benefit right away, you will continue to get more benefits into the future. Already high definition television is redefining viewing standards for television. You can find the best Comcast deals easily at www.bestcabledeals.org
Category: articles
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